(Source: mkeverydays, via thingfoundry)

prostheticknowledge:

Eternal Portraits

Art project by Brian House are framed pieces of Facebook Facial Recognition data of users (thus, a portrait of users characteristics):

Facebook uses face recognition software to identify its users in photos. This works via a ‘template’ of your facial features that is created from your profile images. These features — the distance between your eyes, the symmetry of your mouth — generally do not change over time. Unlike a photograph, which captures some ephemeral expression of who you are at a particular moment, a face recognition template forever remains your portrait. It is all possible photos, taken and untaken, by which you, or someone else, might document your life.

These templates are Facebook’s proprietary data. For a brief period in 2013, users could access their template using the “Download a copy of your Facebook data” option in the settings (it is no longer included in the download). The information is unusable in its raw form without knowing the specifics of Facebook’s algorithm. But as an irrevocable corporate byproduct, the future implications of such data remain unclear.

Eternal Portraits is a series of printed and framed face recognition template data from our friends and ourselves.

More at Brian’s website here

(via bookuse)

neo-constructivist:

(via The Guggenheim Museum in New York. Interpretation of the role of structure through collaboration between Frank Lloyd Wright, and Jaroslav J. Polivka | TECTÓNICAblog)

neo-constructivist:

(via The Guggenheim Museum in New York. Interpretation of the role of structure through collaboration between Frank Lloyd Wright, and Jaroslav J. Polivka | TECTÓNICAblog)

there-is-no-there-there:

Louis Kahn by Andreas Levers

there-is-no-there-there:

Louis Kahn by Andreas Levers

(Source: nprfreshair, via rchtctrstdntblg)

wandrlust:

Miller House, Eero Saarinen, Columbus, IN, 1957 — Balthazar Korab

infiniteinterior:

Soviet spacecraft interiors

(Note especially the landscape painting on the wall in the first design - to remind the cosmonauts of Earth)

(via thingfoundry)

mapsontheweb:

Rejected proposal for French administrative divisions, 1790

mapsontheweb:

Rejected proposal for French administrative divisions, 1790

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org)

mapsinchoate:


Map of traffic densities in Calcutta, 1913

consttype

mapsinchoate:

Map of traffic densities in Calcutta, 1913

consttype

(via charlmalan)

There is no speech or performance addressed to a public that does not try to specify in advance, in countless highly condensed ways, the lifeworld of its circulation: not just through its discursive claims — of the kind that can be said to be oriented to understanding — but through the pragmatics of its speech genres, idioms, stylistic markers, address, temporality, mise-en-scène, citational field, interlocutory protocols, lexicon, and so on. Its circulatory fate is the realization of that world. Public discourse says not only “Let a public exist” but “Let it have this character, speak this way, see the world in this way.” It then goes in search of confirmation that such a public exists, with greater or lesser success—success being further attempts to cite, circulate, and realize the world understanding it articulates. Run it up the flagpole and see who salutes. Put on a show and see who shows up.
Michael Warner, “Publics and Counterpublics,” Publics and Counterpublics, p. 114 (via autolykoi)

(via notational)

sweetspicenice:

“Organisms inhabiting a single cubic foot of space from ‘One Cubic Foot’ by photographer David Liittschwager.”

sweetspicenice:

Organisms inhabiting a single cubic foot of space from ‘One Cubic Foot’ by photographer David Liittschwager.”

(via scalesofperception)

theatlanticcities:


There are many ways to contextualize America’s growing economic and racial inequality: through the growth of new tech hubs in old industrial cities, the cost burden of inadequate transit access, or simply by comparing the lowest and highest earners in each region.
In the case of Chicago, this series of maps, which show the disappearing middle class since 1970, may be the most striking and easy-to-process yet.

-40 Years of Chicago’s Rising Inequality, in One GIF

theatlanticcities:

There are many ways to contextualize America’s growing economic and racial inequality: through the growth of new tech hubs in old industrial cities, the cost burden of inadequate transit access, or simply by comparing the lowest and highest earners in each region.

In the case of Chicago, this series of maps, which show the disappearing middle class since 1970, may be the most striking and easy-to-process yet.

-40 Years of Chicago’s Rising Inequality, in One GIF

(via sunlightcities)

ankelinz:

lift balance /Wright brothers 1901

ankelinz:

lift balance /Wright brothers 1901

(Source: alysejoelleblog, via ofotherspaces)