colectivo21:

The Vitrine City . James Mak

(via documentarycity)

germanpostwarmodern:

The so-called “Wohnhügelhaus” (1968) while still under construction in Marl, Germany. Design by Roland Frey, Hermann Schröder, Claus Schmidt and Peter Faller

germanpostwarmodern:

The so-called “Wohnhügelhaus” (1968) while still under construction in Marl, Germany. Design by Roland Frey, Hermann Schröder, Claus Schmidt and Peter Faller

(Source: baukunst-nrw.de)

scanzen:

Mapping the Milky Way. William Herschel’s galaxy maps (facsimile), 2009 (originals 1784–85). 

William Herschel and his sister Caroline made the first maps of the structure of our galaxy. For two years they surveyed thousands of stars, using their brightness to estimate distance from Earth.

Source: Science Museum - Courtesy of Royal Astronomical Society

(via freshphotons)

syfycity:

Chinese Bitcoin Mine

syfycity:

Chinese Bitcoin Mine

(via geonautica)

Nature in the city is far more than trees and gardens, and weeds in sidewalk cracks and vacant lots. It is the air we breathe, the earth we stand on, the water we drink and excrete, and the organisms with which we share our habitat… It is the consequence of a complex interaction between the multiple purposes and activities of human beings and other living creatures and of the natural processes that govern the transfer of energy, the movement of air, the erosion of the earth, and the hydrologic cycle. The city is part of nature….The realization that nature is ubiquitous, a whole that embraces the city, has powerful implications for how the city is built and maintained, and for the health, safety, and welfare of every resident….The city must be recognized as part of nature and designed accordingly. The city, suburbs, and surrounding countryside must be viewed as a single, evolving system within nature, as must every individual park and building within that larger whole…. Nature in the city must be cultivated, like a garden, rather than ignored or subdued
Spirn (1984) ‘The Granite Garden: Urban Nature and Human Design ’ (via sociology-of-space)

blueberryboat:

various covers for eliel saarinen’s the city: its growth, its decay, its future

What’s emerging from these studies isn’t just a theory of language or of metaphor. It’s a nascent theory of consciousness. Any algorithmic system faces the problem of bootstrapping itself from computing to knowing, from bit-shuffling to caring. Igniting previously stored memories of bodily experiences seems to be one way of getting there. And so may be the ability to create asymmetric neural linkages that say this is like (but not identical to) that. In an age of brain scanning as well as poetry, that’s where metaphor gets you.
Your Brain on Metaphors - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education (via wildcat2030)

(via notational)

thechemistryset:

Gian Paolo Valenti. Architecture D’Aujourd’Hui, 1962

thechemistryset:

Gian Paolo ValentiArchitecture D’Aujourd’Hui, 1962

(Source: rndrd.com, via activator-inhibitor)

architizer:

Richard Sexton’s ravishing take on Latin Caribbean architecture.

architizer:

Richard Sexton’s ravishing take on Latin Caribbean architecture.

theenergyissue:

Sea Soup: Mary Barker’s Photo Collages of Ocean Trash

Scientists have informally dubbed the discarded human waste accumulating in our oceans with a number of names: “soup,” “trash vortex,” and most nobly, the “Great Pacific garbage patch.” The last term makes particular reference to the exceptionally high relative concentrations of pelagic plastics, chemical sludge and other debris that have been trapped by the currents of the North Pacific Gyre, one of the five major oceanic gyres on the planet. Gyres, large systems of rotating ocean currents, are the largest ecosystems in the world and, more recently, ground zero for massive accretions of plastic trash. In researching this phenomenon, UK photographer Mandy Barker developed a series of images entitled ‘Soup’ which depicts these plastics and discarded items salvaged from beaches around the world. Presented in beautifully precise, color-coded arrangements, the collected objects appear as a taxonomy of unique species in a toxic “ecosystem.” The images also underscore the longevity of even the tiniest pieces of trash: though haphazardly discarded and forgotten, they form an ever-growing environmental issue. Barker’s project, by bringing a seemingly remote subject into clear view, compels us to address this elephant in the room.

(Source: designboom.com, via theenergyissue)

mindyourgarden:

Minghu Wetland Park (Liupanshui City, China)

The project is situated along the Shuicheng River. The scope of the task includes ecological restoration of the river, the upgrading of urban open space system, as well as increasing the value of urban waterfront land. The landscape along the Shuicheng River is therefore recovered as an ecological infrastructure providing ecological services to the region. After nearly three years of project phase one design and construction, the once highly polluted and channelized waterway of Liupanshui City has been transformed back into the lifeline of the city through the use of vegetation and natural embankments.

by Turenscape

(via ceevee5)

sierraeast:

Noah Addis, Mirpur One; Dhaka.
From the series, Future Cities.

sierraeast:

Noah Addis, Mirpur One; Dhaka.

From the series, Future Cities.