That time someone walked out of the Museum of Modern Art with Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel. (New York Magazine, 8/21/95)
I just like the idea of someone getting stuck in revolving doors with the thing.

That time someone walked out of the Museum of Modern Art with Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel. (New York Magazine, 8/21/95)

I just like the idea of someone getting stuck in revolving doors with the thing.

1910-again:

Paul-Jordan Smith (under the pseudonym of Pavel Jerdanowitch), Illumination c.1926
"Jordan-Smith may be best known today for a hoax that he initiated in 1924, in part out of a dislike of modern art that was evident as far back as 1913, when he saw (and largely rejected) the traveling version of the notorious Armory Show at the Art Institute of Chicago. Giving himself the Russian-sounding pseudonym Pavel Jerdanowitch, Jordan-Smith painted a small group of crudely Postimpressionist canvases that he then entered in art exhibitions around the country as exemplars of a new art movement known as Disumbrationism. His canvases were well received on the whole until he got tired of sustaining the role and outed himself to a Los Angeles Times reporter in 1927."

1910-again:

Paul-Jordan Smith (under the pseudonym of Pavel Jerdanowitch), Illumination c.1926

"Jordan-Smith may be best known today for a hoax that he initiated in 1924, in part out of a dislike of modern art that was evident as far back as 1913, when he saw (and largely rejected) the traveling version of the notorious Armory Show at the Art Institute of Chicago. Giving himself the Russian-sounding pseudonym Pavel Jerdanowitch, Jordan-Smith painted a small group of crudely Postimpressionist canvases that he then entered in art exhibitions around the country as exemplars of a new art movement known as Disumbrationism. His canvases were well received on the whole until he got tired of sustaining the role and outed himself to a Los Angeles Times reporter in 1927."

(Source: blogs.artinfo.com)

archiveofaffinities:

Haus-Rucker-Co., Piece of Nature, 1977

archiveofaffinities:

Haus-Rucker-Co., Piece of Nature, 1977

onsomething:

9 Pillars | Honden at Izumo Shrine



Via 1
"The honden has a symbolic central pillar (shin no mihashira), reflecting the mythological pillar by which Japan’s creators Izanagi and Izanami descended from heaven.” Via 
"The honden’s interior is a square divided into four identical sections, each covered by 15 tatami.” Via

onsomething:

9 Pillars | Honden at Izumo Shrine

Via 1

"The honden has a symbolic central pillar (shin no mihashira), reflecting the mythological pillar by which Japan’s creators Izanagi and Izanami descended from heaven.” Via

"The honden’s interior is a square divided into four identical sections, each covered by 15 tatami.” Via

(via documentarycity)

The Singularity Already Happened; We Got Corporations

quietbabylon:

One of my favourite recurring tropes of AI speculation/singulatarian deep time thinking is mediations on how an evil AI or similar might destroy us.

Here’s a recent example, Ross Anderson on human extinction as quoted/linked by Kottke. It’s a discussion about how a benign…

(via notational)

softpyramid:

Robert Duchesnay Walking on the top-level platform 1984A photograph of Joseph Beuys in Buckminster Fuller’s iconic geodesic dome of the Expo 67 pavilion on Montreal’s Île Sainte-Hélène.

softpyramid:

Robert Duchesnay
Walking on the top-level platform

1984


A photograph of Joseph Beuys in Buckminster Fuller’s iconic geodesic dome of the Expo 67 pavilion on Montreal’s Île Sainte-Hélène.

midcenturymodernfreak:

Great Balls of Fire!
American Pavilion on fire at Montreal World’s Fair 1967 (Expo 67), designed by Richard Buckminster Fuller (a pioneer of geodesic structures, albeit geodesics were discovered by Walther Bauersfeld). The fire occurred in 1976. - Via

midcenturymodernfreak:

Great Balls of Fire!

American Pavilion on fire at Montreal World’s Fair 1967 (Expo 67), designed by Richard Buckminster Fuller (a pioneer of geodesic structures, albeit geodesics were discovered by Walther Bauersfeld). The fire occurred in 1976. - Via

(via documentarycity)

genericarchitecture:

Revised Pantheon

Fala+Felipe Paixo

[2012]

(via spatialscenariosstuff)

336bc:

The old city of Al-’Ula, Saudi Arabia, built in the 13th century.  In the 20th century the new town center was established beside the old town and eventually the people left the old buildings. The last inhabitants left in 1983.

336bc:

The old city of Al-’Ula, Saudi Arabia, built in the 13th century.  In the 20th century the new town center was established beside the old town and eventually the people left the old buildings. The last inhabitants left in 1983.

(Source: National Geographic, via spatialscenariosstuff)

(Source: vincentbroquaire)

architectureofdoom:

Model for a City for Pilgrims, Mina, Kenzo Tange/Kenji Ekuan, 1974

architectureofdoom:

Model for a City for Pilgrims, Mina, Kenzo Tange/Kenji Ekuan, 1974

(Source: relationalthought.wordpress.com, via activator-inhibitor)

gasoline-station:

Radisson Blu Iveria: A Luxury Hotel That Became a Refugee Camp

Via

The Radisson Blu Iveria Hotel is located at the center of Georgia’s capital city Tbilisi. Built in 1967, it was Georgia’s finest hotel and a popular place to stay for its excellent location and sweeping views of the city. Then in the early 1990s, soon after the collapse and subsequent breakup of the USSR, civil war broke out in Georgia. Tbilisi was flooded with refugee ethnic Georgians coming in from the disputed territory of Abkhazia on the west of Georgia. More than 200,000 refugees poured into the city and the government was faced to deal with their reallocation. Many buildings in Tbilisi, including Hotel Iveria, were reallocated for housing the displaced. A thousand of them wound up in the hotel’s 22 floors where they would remain for the next ten years.

The hotel had been lying vacant at that time, unable to do business after the collapse of the Soviet Union and associated collapse of Georgia’s tourism industry. The monumental Soviet building that dominates the Georgian capital’s skyline became a pitiful sight, with broken windows patched up with cellophane, broken railings, crude plywood constructions on the balconies and a gaudy miscellany of washing hung everywhere.

(Source: ryanpanos, via sociology-of-space)