repulsion66:

Nam June Paik and Shya Abe. Robot K-456. 1965

repulsion66:

Nam June Paik and Shya Abe. Robot K-456. 1965

rogerstrunk:

Robot server at the Two Panda Deli in Pasadena, California (photo: Lowell Georgia, 1985)

rogerstrunk:

Robot server at the Two Panda Deli in Pasadena, California (photo: Lowell Georgia, 1985)

(Source: smithsonianmag.com)

archatlas:

 Bas Princen

(via documentarycity)

danielkbrown:

Cristiano Toraldo - Superstudio | Holiday Machine (Máquina de vacaciones) | Tropea, Italia | 1967

This was my final thesis dealing with the restoration of a trait of the Calabrian coast, designing the rebuilt nature as a Holiday machine, part of a research that we called Technomorphic Architecture. The building has no facade and the shape is determined by the negative of the land erosion.

(via neo-constructivist)

retroreverbs:

A First Course in Coding Theory by Raymond Hill (1986 edition).

retroreverbs:

A First Course in Coding Theory by Raymond Hill (1986 edition).

(via activator-inhibitor)

(Source: win98se, via computeruser-computerloser)

transitmaps:

Submission — Unofficial Map: Intercity and Commuter Rail of North America’s East Coast by Edward Powell

Submitted by Isaac Fischer, who says:

Here’s a neat map I found online that shows the entire American east coast, as well as southeastern Canada. It shows both commuter and intercity rail lines. As far as I can tell, it seems fairly accurate, and could definitely be useful.

——

Transit Maps says:

While there’s more than a passing resemblance to my own Amtrak Passenger Rail map here — both in the general aesthetics of the map and in the circle/line device used to indicate whether trains call at a station or not — this map adds another whole level of detail by adding commuter rail services (and eastern Canada!) to the mix.

Note that the map shows intercity and commuter rail only, meaning that in New York, for example, the LIRR and Metro-North lines are shown, but not the subway. For a map of this scale (the entire eastern seaboard), that seems like a wise choice.

The layout of the map is great: nice and clean, very diagrammatic but still mindful of the “lay of the land”. The use of a single, distinctive colour for each agency also works really well — Amtrak’s distinctive teal blue and purple for the MBTA commuter rail are especially effective.

However, I find the typography less inspiring, with labels at a lot of different angles combined with some fairly lacklustre type layout for the different agency legends.

Edward also could have proofed his work a little better (although it’s definitely difficult to do a project this size, as I well know!). Even a cursory look at the map revealed quite a few errors, including labelling all the commuter rail stations in Florida as “VIA”, rather than “TRI” for Tri-Rail. Lake Worth station is also included twice, at the expense of Boynton Beach. Meanwhile, in Philadelphia, a duplicate Chestnut Hill East station strangely serves as the terminus for the Chester Hill West line. And so on…

Our rating: great diagrammatic layout (although too huge to ever realistically be reproduced as a poster), but let down a bit by some average type treatment. Still a lot of detail to savour and enjoy, though! Three stars.

3 Stars

Source: Edward’s DeviantArt account

blech:

From The Shortest Path to Happiness: Recommending Beautiful, Quiet, and Happy Routes in the City by Daniele QuerciaRossano Schifanella, and Luca Maria Aiello, four routes from Euston Square to Tate Modern prioritised by shortness, beauty, quiet, and happiness.

To meet our research goal, we make three main contributions:

  • We build a graph whose nodes are locations and whose edges connect geographic neighbors (§3.1). With this graph, we rank locations based on whether they are emotionally pleasant. The emotion scores come from a crowd-sourcing platform that shows two street scenes in London (out of hundreds), and a user votes on which one looks more beautiful, quiet, and happy (§3.2).
  • We quantitatively validate the extent to which our pro- posal recommends paths that are not only short but also emotionally-pleasing (§4). We then qualitatively evaluate the recommendations by conducting a user study involving 30 participants in London.
  • We finally test the generalizability of our proposal by: a) presenting a way of predicting the beauty scores from Flickr metadata; and b) testing the beauty-deri- ved paths with our 30 participants in London and with a new group of 54 participants in Boston (§5).

From the abstract:

Based on a quantitative validation, we find that, compared to the shortest routes, the recommended ones add just a few extra walking minutes and are indeed perceived to be more beautiful, quiet, and happy.

via Technology Review, Eric Fischer

(via un)

shihlun:

Sophie Calle, Suite Vénitienne & Jean Baudrillard, Please Follow Me (1988)
pdf

shihlun:

Sophie Calle, Suite Vénitienne & Jean Baudrillard, Please Follow Me (1988)

pdf

deathandmysticism:

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Whatever I do, I do not repent, I keep pissing against the Moon, 1558

deathandmysticism:

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Whatever I do, I do not repent, I keep pissing against the Moon, 1558

(via othersystems)

That time someone walked out of the Museum of Modern Art with Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel. (New York Magazine, 8/21/95)
I just like the idea of someone getting stuck in revolving doors with the thing.

That time someone walked out of the Museum of Modern Art with Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel. (New York Magazine, 8/21/95)

I just like the idea of someone getting stuck in revolving doors with the thing.

1910-again:

Paul-Jordan Smith (under the pseudonym of Pavel Jerdanowitch), Illumination c.1926
"Jordan-Smith may be best known today for a hoax that he initiated in 1924, in part out of a dislike of modern art that was evident as far back as 1913, when he saw (and largely rejected) the traveling version of the notorious Armory Show at the Art Institute of Chicago. Giving himself the Russian-sounding pseudonym Pavel Jerdanowitch, Jordan-Smith painted a small group of crudely Postimpressionist canvases that he then entered in art exhibitions around the country as exemplars of a new art movement known as Disumbrationism. His canvases were well received on the whole until he got tired of sustaining the role and outed himself to a Los Angeles Times reporter in 1927."

1910-again:

Paul-Jordan Smith (under the pseudonym of Pavel Jerdanowitch), Illumination c.1926

"Jordan-Smith may be best known today for a hoax that he initiated in 1924, in part out of a dislike of modern art that was evident as far back as 1913, when he saw (and largely rejected) the traveling version of the notorious Armory Show at the Art Institute of Chicago. Giving himself the Russian-sounding pseudonym Pavel Jerdanowitch, Jordan-Smith painted a small group of crudely Postimpressionist canvases that he then entered in art exhibitions around the country as exemplars of a new art movement known as Disumbrationism. His canvases were well received on the whole until he got tired of sustaining the role and outed himself to a Los Angeles Times reporter in 1927."

(Source: blogs.artinfo.com)