Inuit Tactile Maps

opencartographies:

image

…wood was, and is, the most distinctive medium used by the Greenland Eskimos in mapmaking. Blocks are carved in relief to represent the rugged coastline of Greenland with its fjords, islands, nunataks and glaciers, the shapes of the various islands being linked together with rods. In order to reduce the size of the blocks, the outline of the coast is carried up one side and down the other.”

Leo Bagrow, History of Cartography 1951

Tactile maps for navigating the coast lines of Greenland produced by inuits. The following posts describe the history of these objects in much more detail:

http://arctickingdom.com/tactile-maps-of-greenland/

http://middlesavagery.wordpress.com/2008/03/01/tactile-maps-and-imaginary-geographies/

UNI: MH3284

fyeaheasterneurope:


I’m Lovin’ It (Most of the Time): A Brief History of McDonald’s in Serbia
Russian courts on Wednesday ordered the closure of three McDonald’s restaurants in Moscow for the maximum 90 days allowed by law, including the first location to open in the Soviet Union back in 1990. Officials said the three American culinary outposts were being shuttered for health violations, but the mounting case against McDonald’s in Russia has been widely interpreted as retaliation for Western sanctions. Some media outlets have reported that the more than 430 McDonald’s restaurants in Russia are all due to be inspected soon. Whatever the Big Mac’s fate is in Russia, McDonald’s already has a history of stirring up major controversy in the former Yugoslavia, where the fast food chain has been both loved and loathed, a source of national pride and a detested symbol of US foreign policy. 
In March of 1988, Belgrade, Yugoslavia became the first city in the communist world to open a McDonald’s restaurant. American newspapers were still steeped in quaint Cold War clichés at the time, and ran headlines like “First Big Mac Attack Against Communism!” and “McMarxism?” Nearly half a century after two brothers named Mac n’ Dick opened the first McDonald’s restaurant in California’s Inland Empire, “Mickey D’s” received a heroes’ welcome in communist Yugoslavia. With lines wrapped around the block and police forces brought in for crowd control, the opening of the first McDonald’s in Eastern Europe was by all accounts the most successful restaurant launch in Belgrade history. More than 6,000 people were served on opening day, setting a new record for Europe.
And thus began the long and deeply conflicted relationship between McDonald’s and the people of Belgrade.

Continue reading ->

fyeaheasterneurope:

I’m Lovin’ It (Most of the Time): A Brief History of McDonald’s in Serbia

Russian courts on Wednesday ordered the closure of three McDonald’s restaurants in Moscow for the maximum 90 days allowed by law, including the first location to open in the Soviet Union back in 1990. Officials said the three American culinary outposts were being shuttered for health violations, but the mounting case against McDonald’s in Russia has been widely interpreted as retaliation for Western sanctions. Some media outlets have reported that the more than 430 McDonald’s restaurants in Russia are all due to be inspected soon. Whatever the Big Mac’s fate is in Russia, McDonald’s already has a history of stirring up major controversy in the former Yugoslavia, where the fast food chain has been both loved and loathed, a source of national pride and a detested symbol of US foreign policy. 

In March of 1988, Belgrade, Yugoslavia became the first city in the communist world to open a McDonald’s restaurant. American newspapers were still steeped in quaint Cold War clichés at the time, and ran headlines like “First Big Mac Attack Against Communism!” and “McMarxism?” Nearly half a century after two brothers named Mac n’ Dick opened the first McDonald’s restaurant in California’s Inland Empire, “Mickey D’s” received a heroes’ welcome in communist Yugoslavia. With lines wrapped around the block and police forces brought in for crowd control, the opening of the first McDonald’s in Eastern Europe was by all accounts the most successful restaurant launch in Belgrade history. More than 6,000 people were served on opening day, setting a new record for Europe.

And thus began the long and deeply conflicted relationship between McDonald’s and the people of Belgrade.

Continue reading ->

socks-studio:

Ascii-Art Mapping: SyMAP, or Early Computer Generated Cartography
http://socks-studio.com/2014/03/11/ascii-art-mapping-symap-or-early-computer-generated-cartography/
William Caraher, assistant professor at the University of North Dakota and writer of the site “The Archaeology of the Mediterranean World” discovered an interesting early use of computer analysis for an archaeological area in Cyprus, Eastern Mediterranean. The original…
Read more on:
http://socks-studio.com/2014/03/11/ascii-art-mapping-symap-or-early-computer-generated-cartography/
archaeology, Cartography, computer, mapping, Culture, Technology, Territories

socks-studio:

Ascii-Art Mapping: SyMAP, or Early Computer Generated Cartography

http://socks-studio.com/2014/03/11/ascii-art-mapping-symap-or-early-computer-generated-cartography/

William Caraher, assistant professor at the University of North Dakota and writer of the site “The Archaeology of the Mediterranean World” discovered an interesting early use of computer analysis for an archaeological area in Cyprus, Eastern Mediterranean. The original…

Read more on:
http://socks-studio.com/2014/03/11/ascii-art-mapping-symap-or-early-computer-generated-cartography/

archaeology, Cartography, computer, mapping, Culture, Technology, Territories

(via territorealities)

Maps are not copies, they are projections… When drawing up a map, a cartographer must choose between zenithal, gnomonic, stereographic, orthographic, globular, conical, cylindrical, or sinusoidal modes of projections. Each of these brings with it as many disadvantages as benefits. Projections are not neutral, natural, or ‘given’: they are constructed, configured, underpinned by various—and quite arbitrary—conventions… And yet, explicitly or not, all maps carry with them a certain claim; that this one is somehow truer than the others with which it competes.

Tom McCarthy, Mapping It Out: An Alternative Atlas of Contemporary Cartographies

(via tiggerbounced)

(via fuckyeahcartography)

mikasavela:

World map (Weltkarte) by Jasper Johns, 1967-1971.

Kind of reminds me about the Dymaxion projection.

(Source: bildindex.de)

wandrlust:

Ecotopia, View of San Francisco bay with solar power stations, 1982 — Craig Hodgetts

wandrlust:

Ecotopia, View of San Francisco bay with solar power stations, 1982 — Craig Hodgetts

theenergyissue:

Intolerable Beauty: Portraits of American Mass Consumption

For his series Intolerable Beauty, photographer Chris Jordanpeered into shipping ports and industrial yards around America. Though these sites remain unseen by the majority of the population, they hold the stunningly massive remains of our collective consumption. Jordan’s findings include seemingly boundless troves of cell phones, e-waste, circuit boards, cell phone chargers, cars, spent bullet casings, cigarette butts, and steel shred. Jordan describes the immense scale of our detritus as simultaneously “desolate, macabre, oddly comical and ironic, and even darkly beautiful.” Like Edward Burtynsky’s photographs of our vast industrial landscapes, Jordan’s images portray a staggering complexity that verges on the sublime. The photographs reflect the loss of individual identity that results from actions that occur on such a large scale, but Jordan hopes his work can “serve as portals to a kind of cultural self-inquiry” and inspire people to reestablish a personal stake in issues of energy consumption.

satellite-delight:

28.375362,-81.547858

28.367126,-81.560258

28.374218,-81.549414

28.41639,-81.581194

wandrlust:

World Trade Center, New York City, October, 1975 — Jean-Pierre Laffont

Two homeless men squat in the shadow of the recently completed World Trade Center. New York City was on the verge of bankruptcy and the World Trade Center sat largely vacant, unable to find companies to fill its large office spaces.

wandrlust:

World Trade Center, New York City, October, 1975 — Jean-Pierre Laffont

Two homeless men squat in the shadow of the recently completed World Trade Center. New York City was on the verge of bankruptcy and the World Trade Center sat largely vacant, unable to find companies to fill its large office spaces.

purestform:

Semiology of Graphics, 1983by Jacques Bertin

purestform:

Semiology of Graphics, 1983
by Jacques Bertin

baisao:

Tea bowl shapes
more info

(Source: beingtowardsauthenticity, via mightbewhite)

colectivo21:

The Vitrine City . James Mak

(via documentarycity)